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Oracle IPM 10g and Imaging 11g Migration

One of the things we’ve done a lot of here at ImageSource are migrations. It’s definitely one our core competencies. For a little more information on our approach to migrations, you can review my earlier post here. Lately, migrations have been more focused because the majority of them involve moving content out of the Oracle IPM 10g or Oracle Imaging 11g products. Oracle IPM 10g has reached end-of-life, and Oracle Imaging 11g was the terminal release of the product, so essentially that product line is dead. The IPM 10g product was something we worked with for many years, so we have a wealth of knowledge on its “ins and outs.” IPM was a feature-rich, but older, product stack, and it was in need of a rewrite. However, when Oracle rewrote the product as Imaging 11g, there were a lot of key and important features that didn’t make the cut.

Because of everything I’ve mentioned, businesses running on these particular Oracle ECM platforms have had to make decisions for their long term ECM vision or roadmap. I have worked with a number of clients on technology evaluations and like to help determine their roadmap, but that’s a blog post for another time. One of the key pieces to any ECM roadmap for a company performing  these ECM solution changes is the migration of their content from the systems that they are replacing. Luckily we have ILINX Export and ILINX Import to make these migrations straightforward as possible.

There are a number of options with ILINX Export, but in short we use it to export all content and metadata out of a source system for migration into any destination system. By default, ILINX Export retrieves the content from the source system in exactly the same format it was in when it was added to the original system. By exporting the content out in its native format, a customer can keep a copy of the original data, and any data manipulation or file conversions can be done downstream. ILINX Export does have the ability to convert files to PDF, but we generally recommend image conversion when importing the content into the destination system. Utilizing our knowledge of Oracle ECM, there are plenty of options when extracting the content from these products. For example:

  • Only migrate certain applications.
  • Only migrate content created after, or before, a certain date.
  • Only migrate the content that falls within certain criteria: i.e., specific business unit, a set of document types, or virtually any criteria that can be identified with the content metadata.
  • Split the content up so content that meets certain criteria goes to one destination, and content meeting other criteria goes elsewhere.
  • Retain the IPM, or Imaging, annotations. These can be flattened into the documents, but I only recommended that in certain instances. If the client is migrating to ILINX Content Store, we can migrate the annotations as an overlay into the new ILINX system.
  • There are many options for formatting the data when it its exported from the source system. ILINX Export can output the metadata to text or XML files with complete control of the format, delimiter, field order, layout, and size of those files. That flexibility allows for the creation of input files in a format that can work for just about any destination system.
  • The metadata can also be written directly to SQL to support long term storage or manipulation if necessary.
  • Schedule the export to run during off-hours to keep the load off the servers while clients are using the old system.
  • Detailed auditing of the entire process to help with reporting, compliance and troubleshooting.
  • Many more.

Once you’ve defined all the rules surrounding the migration and started execution, the next step is importing that content and metadata to the destination ECM system. For that, we use our ILINX Import product which I’ll cover in a later post. If you have any questions about ILINX Export, reach out to us for a demo or discussion.

John Linehan
Sr. Systems Engineer
ImageSource, Inc.

Imaging hardware: How to get the best bang for your buck

Why price is not the most important factor when purchasing imaging hardware

When shopping for new imaging hardware, many customers look at their budget and let that dictate their purchase. Now I understand that budget is an important factor, however over the last 9 years working with imaging customers, many have purchased equipment based mainly on price – only to discover that it did not meet their long term growth needs.

So in light of these discussions, here are a few bits of wisdom that can be used as a checklist when considering new purchases:

What  scanner features are essential to you?

  • Color or Black & White (B & W) scanning?
    The majority of scanners automatically come with color option but can also provide B & W scanning for smaller document size files.
  • How fast do you need the scanner to scan?
    Scanners are classed by Pages per Minute (PPM).
  • How much volume are you expecting to scan per day, week or month?
    Volume and speed is determined by the manufacturer when they develop the scanner.
  • Manufacturers group their scanners into categories based on PPM and the Daily Duty Cycle (DDC).
    DDC is how many images the scanner can handle on a daily basis. So if you have a large volume of scanning to be completed on a daily basis, a small desktop workgroup scanner will not be sufficient for the volume – it would break down all the time. Here are the general groupings that manufacturers use:
  • Workgroup/ Low Volume
    Slower, smaller desktop scanners generally under 90PPM and DDC of approximately 500 to 20,000 documents per day, depending on model purchased.
  • Departmental/ Mid Volume
    Scanning speeds ranging 90-125PPM and DDC of approximately 30,000 to 125,000 documents per day, depending on model purchased.
  • High Volume
    Scanning speeds ranging 140-210PPM and DDC of approximately 150,000 to unlimited documents per day, depending on model purchased.
  • Network
    When scanning directly to a network, without the need of additional hardware or software. Scanning speeds tend to be slower for these scanners, generally under 60PPM and DDC of 6,000 per day, depending on model purchased.

What are the characteristics of your document?

  • How big are your batches of documents that you want to scan at one time? 
    Scanners come with different Automatic Document Feeder (ADF) sizes, ranging from 10 pages at a time to scan, up to 750 pages. If you have a large production scanning environment, the more the ADF holds the quicker the scan operator can scan documents. Generally scanners that have higher ADF also have higher PPM and DDC.
  • You need to determine the general sizes of your documents. 
    What is the maximum and minimum sizes, what length are the documents? Larger or longer documents (11 x 17” or 12 x 34”) do require a flatbed scanner or scanner that can handle longer documents.
  • Are they delicate documents that cannot be run through a scanner? This would also indicate you may need a flatbed scanner or a flatbed attachment to the scanner.
  • Do you require pre-scan or post-scan imprinting?
  • Is the scanner easy to clean every day by the user? 
    Are the consumables (rollers etc.) easy to replace by the end user? This can save money and time on the maintenance of the scanner and ensure optimum image clarity and scanning performance.

What value-add does the vendor/manufacturer offer?

  • Does the manufacturer offer evaluation or demo scanners for you to test before the purchase? 
    This is important when purchasing larger production scanners, it will help determine which scanner is the best fit for your scanning needs.
  • What type of scanner hardware maintenance contracts does the manufacturer offer? 
    Some include 1 year or multiple years in with the scanner purchase price and will save you money.
  • Will shipping be included in the initial purchase or is it an additional cost?

Many customers work with ImageSource to help them select the best fit, or to evaluate scanners side by side to determine what is the best bang for their buck. As you can see from the information above, sometimes price is not the only factor to consider with your new purchase.Let us help you!

To learn more about ImageSource, and all of the content management services we provide, visit us here.

11 Questions to Ask in Order to Buy the Correct Wide Format Scanner

At ImageSource, we have many customers who call in asking for information on Wide Format Scanners. Selecting the right Wide Format Scanner for your needs is imperative, as manufacturers do not normally provide evaluation scanners for you to test.

I always recommend that customers review a software webinar demo before buying these larger scanners. The software functionality and ease of use is an important differentiator between scanner manufacturers. The incorrect software combined with a scanner that does not meet all your needs can be a costly investment that cannot be returned to the manufacturer. In this category of scanner, the cheapest price tag does not necessarily mean the best fit!

There are some basic questions that we always ask our customers in order to qualify what scanner(s) is the most appropriate. I would like to share these to help you with any future selection processes/decisions.

  1. Do you need B&W, Grayscale, Color capabilities?
  2. If Color is required, is it Color critical (such as photos and art work), or simple color (such asline drawings or printed maps)?
  3. What is the largest size original you will be scanning?
  4. Is speed important? Will this be production scanning or just occasional scanning?
  5. Approximately how many scans per month?
  6. What condition are your originals in? Poor (folded with a lot of background), Medium or Good quality?
  7. What kinds of media will you be scanning? Paper, blueprints, Mylar, stitched linen (very old documents), maps, etc.
  8. Do you need thick document scanning capabilities?
  9. Do you need a stand and catch basket?
  10. Will this be a scan-to-file application or do you need scan-to-print (copy) functions as well?
  11. Will you need to edit, modify or convert any of the images into CAD or GIS file formats?

We have been working with the major Wide Format Scanner manufacturers for many years so we are here to help give our expertise for any questions you may have. ImageSource will make it easy for you and guide you towards the “best fit”.

We are here to help!

Megan Lane
Inside Sales Account Executive
ImageSource, Inc.

Don’t Leave Money on the Table – How To Receive Cash For Old Scanners

As an Inside Sales Account Executive at ImageSource, I am constantly having conversations with customers that realize they have to upgrade their older scanning equipment.

What surprises me is that many customers do not know they may be eligible to receive trade-in credits or rebates for their old scanners when purchasing new equipment.

Some manufacturers also organize eco-friendly disposal of your used equipment at no charge.

If you have old scanners that need replacing, you might be surprised at the trade-in credit/rebates that may make this purchase financially achievable now!

Not all equipment qualifies, so please reach out to our team here at ImageSource to see if you can receive $$$!

Contact Megan Lane at (360) 943-9273 or insidesales@imagesourceinc.com.

Megan Lane
Inside Sales Account Executive
ImageSource, Inc.

Increase in small home-based businesses equates to growth of content to manage

Small businesses are major players in the U.S. Economy. According to Forbes.com, over 50% of the working population (120 million individuals) works in a small business.

With the advancements in technology it has become easier for people to create and run small businesses, without insurmountable operating expenses, out of their homes. In fact, 52% of all small businesses are home-based (Forbes.com). This has led to small business growth nationwide and changes in the way these businesses operate.

How do they manage the increasing inflow of content to their businesses?

How do they search and find information effectively?

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