Category Archives for "Document Conversion"

Steps for a successful ECM migration using ILINX Export

As a Sr. Systems Engineer at ImageSource, I am currently engaged on a project where the customer had a need to migrate all content out of their Stellent IBPM 7.6.0.0 software platform. (This is the same product stack as Optika Acorde and Oracle IPM; the product has gone through a few name changes over the years with the different acquisitions.) In my experience, I have found there are several steps that need to be taken when considering migrating content from your current ECM repository.

The first steps in any migration are to analyze existing content and ensure that the majority has been discovered, identified and prioritized.

  1. Categorize content into categories (document types, applications, folders, etc.)
  2. Prioritize content based on:
    1. A business value rating to the content
    2. A difficulty level associated with the migration effort

Categorizing Content:
All discovered content should be cataloged by the indexes or field data that exists for it and the file formats used. All systems that may be migrated need to be investigated for existing export tools that can export data into various formats, such as CSV or directly to custom databases. If the system is lacking any direct export capability built into the product it is necessary to either develop a migration tool or purchase one. In my current project we are using a tool developed by ImageSource called ILINX Export. ILINX Export supports migrations out of Oracle IPM (along with Stellent IBPM and Optika Acorde), WebCenter Content 11g, EMC AppXtender, IBM FileNet P8, and IBM FileNet ImageServices.Continue reading

How to fix an error when configuring Active Directory Federation Services

While recently working to deploy an Active Directory Federation Services (ADFS) instance on a Server 2012 system, I ran into an issue. When I tried to do the initial configuration of the ADFS service from the ADFS console, there was an error that said the Windows Internal Database (WID) could not be started. This WID service is required for the ADFS service to function. I have included the text from the error below, which is very simple to fix once you know the root cause.Continue reading

Converting Image Files

At some point there is going to be a need to convert an Imaging Systems image files from one format to another format when moving to a new Imaging system.  ILINX® Import can be used to handle the conversion.

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Serendipitous Cerebration (Part 2 – Project Planning)

Serendipitous Cerebration as a problem solving technique can only be applied in the rare cases when normal logical troubleshooting has failed.  As much as we hate to admit it, when all logical problem solving avenues have been exhausted and our troubleshooting prowess to a flummoxed state of tentation, this is when we begin to enter the realm where serendipitous cerebration hides in dark, dank crevasses.  In reviewing this project, our hopes are that you can see how the process of Serendipitous Cerebration can develop.

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When handwriting is your only option…. Peter Lang

When researching Enterprise Content Management capture projects, the question of handwriting recognition comes up again and again — and many people aren’t sure what to expect.  More commonly, their expectations are unrealistic. They think there is no hope at all, ever. On the other end of the spectrum, some think that tiny fevered cursive scribblings from a rushed meeting can be scanned (or even faxed) and read with accuracy. In helping people think about their forms and the viability of capturing handwriting, I have a few simple guidelines to consider which seem to apply in a majority of cases.

  • Are handwritten forms really the only option?  If the form is available online, can the data be made “fillable” and then submitted directly to your database tables?  Can you let the user fill the form online and print, thus producing machine print and eliminating handwriting?  How about taking the data that a user entered and bar coding it (if the form must be printed rather than be submitted)?  Also helpful and sometimes overlooked:  prefilling form  data from your database through a merge process with a bar code index for retrieval of that same data.
  • Does your Capture software support ICR?  Intelligent Character Recognition (ICR) is what you need to read handwriting.  Optical Character Recognition (OCR) is much more common and is designed to read machine print.  Please don’t try to make it read handwriting – you won’t like the results!
  • Make sure the handwriting is constrained. Annoying? Perhaps. But making the person filling the form write in boxes sets you up for the most successful ICR results.  The catch phrase here could be “Curse the cursive”.  When a character is joined to another character it is faster to write.  However,  the ICR software really struggles to figure out where one character starts and another stops.  And here’s where recognition tanks.   With the real world example below, we can generally expect 100% recognition.

  • Ask for all caps handwriting. You can often tell your ICR engine to look for upper case characters only. This really

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