Category Archives for "eForms"

Making TeleForm and LiquidOffice Work Together

Scanning and capturing data via OCR can save lots of time over manual indexing.  Linking these same forms and metadata to an eForm workflow process takes it all to the next level of efficiency – processes that took hours and days can be reduced to minutes or seconds.  Using out-of-the-box connectors and settings, form templates that were created in Cardiff TeleForm can be exported to Cardiff LiquidOffice.  With a given form residing in both LiquidOffice and TeleForm, capture choices are broadened and the benefits of workflow are easily in reach.

Here’s how it is done.  TeleForm forms can be saved in a file exchange format that LiquidOffice Designer can read.  Once a TeleForm form is complete and tested, it is ready to go.  The form can be a traditional form that was created from scratch in TeleForm Designer, or it can be an ‘existing form’ created initially outside of TeleForm.  These forms then have TeleForm fields placed in appropriate data entry locations.

Once exported to the file exchange format, the file can be opened in LiquidOffice Designer.  It will look just like the TeleForm form.  An important step here is to save the file to the native LiquidOffice .XFM file format, then close LiquidOffice Designer.  Reopen LiquidOffice Designer and open the .XFM file – this quick step ensures the form can be previewed as an HTML or PDF form, or published to the LiquidOffice server, without error.  The fields in LiquidOffice retain important settings that were created in TeleForm such as field name, maximum length, and valid entry characters. If the form is a traditional TeleForm form, ID and reference marks can be optionally retained.  (This allows a LiquidOffice user to fill a form, print it, and fax or scan it in TeleForm.)

Now that we have identical forms in TeleForm and LiquidOffice, TeleForm can be configured to export metadata to LiquidOffice.   Open the TeleForm form in Designer and add the included LiquidOffice Export connect agent.  When configuring this connect agent, you supply the LiquidOffice form GUID or workflow process GUID.  The GUID uniquely identifies the form or process, and can be located via the LiquidOffice Management Console.   You also identify the LiquidOffice Virtual Submit Directory and routing information.  Since TeleForm can have many export agents attached to it, any current export may also be retained – they will coexist without complaint.

When the form is processed in TeleForm – scanned, faxed, or even created using TeleForm Verifier’s NonForm Data Entry feature, the form will appear in the appropriate inbox or queue in LiquidOffice – filled and ready for approval, ad-hoc routing, or workflow processing.  Now that the form exists in LiquidOffice, you may also direct users to fill the forms directly from LiquidOffice when appropriate, bypassing TeleForm altogether.  The form now has grown wings and is ready to fly.

Advanced eForms Strategies for LiquidOffice

Information technology can improve operational efficiency and businesses are turning to forms processing for automating complex processes where information is often very dynamic and acted upon in parallel.  Many of our clients request very complicated multi-form rule based combinations that can be extremely complex and have data dictionaries exceeding 1,500 form fields.  There are two different ways to approach advanced multi-form development and design.  One is to use a method called form chaining or you can use tools such as Liquid Office Case Management.

Form Chaining is a method of displaying subsequent forms based on the submission of the original form.  This is done when field data from the first form is mapped to the 2nd form – chained forms open sequentially upon submission of a primary form.  Simple chaining can be achieved using out-of-the box features of the LiquidOffice Process studio.  Outside of a formal workflow, the same results can be achieved.  The following is code example for ad-hoc form chaining. Continue reading

Tuning ECM Capture Systems – Is It Optional?

Recognizing forms and then performing successful OCR and ICR is a result of careful planning.   Then comes plenty of testing during development, exploiting every advantage you can discover.  Once rolling, are the results what you expect?  All of that testing should ensure the answer is YES.  But if they are falling short of expectation, it’s time to tune.  Are image enhancement/preprocessing settings set optimally (or are they in place at all?).  Are alphanumeric fields defined in such a way that the OCR engines aren’t trying to discern zeros from letter O’s?  For handwriting, do forms have text instructions coaching the users how to write ‘between the lines’?  Are you matching expected data with available dictionaries encompassing all possible entries?  These are just a few of the questions to ask while tuning a paper capture system.  At ImageSource, we’ll work to resolve recognition problems you are experiencing to maximize your ROI and data throughput.

Peter Lang
ImageSource

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